11/21/2017

After the flood, rebuilding

There is the moment and moments, or the days and weeks of fire or water or manmade disaster. In that time, in my experience, many people behave admirably and humanity shines. Everyday people become outstanding heroes. They bear the loss of electricity and water remarkably well. It’s the aftermath, the time long after the flood lights and news cameras leave. (In Ferguson, on Canfield Lane, one of Mike Brown’s neighbors told me that she had a hard time sleeping because the press was always there.) It is the future time that reasonable people look forward to and are full of hope that they can expect to be normal and whole again, except that the situation is still different, and there are still holes. The walls of your home are still moldy, and you can’t just patch them up but you still have to live there.

Many people are fortunate to not know how long it takes to rebuild after a storm.

In the moment of Sandy, first responders and medical providers carried babies and patients down 20 flights of stairs. They didn’t and couldn’t carry all the laboratory mice who were being used in potentially life-saving cancer research. They couldn’t take the specimens that scientists had been working on for years. We talk about the lives that were lost, the homes and property that was damaged, but no one thinks about the lives that could have been saved from the decades and hundreds of millions of dollars of research. Many of those primary investigators left.

It was the months and year afterwards, where they couldn’t even see patients, and had to rotate at other hospitals. So the patients flowed, conceivably, or maybe just didn’t show up and prolonged what might have been treatable diseases had they caught them earlier. Stacking the health care safety net system is like stacking the initial rows of cannonballs or molecules. How you place them, what shape, what geometry determines the final shape of the pyramid. That’s how it goes with patient flow.

The photo above is where my husband graduated from residency at NYU Bellevue. The high water mark is 11 feet, taller than any of the graduates or speakers. 5 months later, Hurricane Sandy hit and I was on a campaign in another state. Someone asked me if I was worried for my husband and I said, “He’ll be okay, Bellevue is a fortress and it has backup generators.” And it is and it was. But the backup generators were underground, and they flooded. For a while afterwards, I was slightly obsessed with FEMA.

For all the Congressmembers and Senators who voted no or equivocated and dithered on Hurricane Sandy funding and claimed that the money in the relief package was “pork,” the money was for rebuilding. So that the tri-state area has coastlines with natural defenses against the rising waters due to climate change. As opposed to building houses for low income families or rich people right along the ooast.

Rebuilding and recovering resilience takes a very long time. We should let people go on with their lives, but instead, people who have been lucky to escape with their lives, but who have lost their homes and memories are forced to tabulate everything that they have lost for insurance adjusters. My friend who lost her home in a fire told me, “It felt like reliving the trauma.”

All this is to say, people will be hurting for months if not years after. Their lives will be altered. Limited English proficient folks sometimes get overlooked because they don’t understand how to apply for grants or loans. OCA Houston and AAPI nonprofits have set up an AAPI Harvey Relief Fund. Please give.

Job Announcement: 2017 Joe Montano Fellow for Virginia State Campaigns

Joe Montano (1968-2016) was a prominent activist for Asian American causes, grassroots campaign organizer, close aide to Senator Tim Kaine (D-Virginia) and was Senator Kaine’s Northern Virginia representative. The Asian American Action Fund (AAAFund) and Democratic Asian Americans of Virginia (DAAV) join together to sponsor the Joe Montano Campaign Fellowship Program in his memory.

We are looking for a passionate, hardworking individual who is committed to helping elect Virginia Democrats this year in some of the most hotly contested races in the country.

Role Overview

The Joe Montano Fellow will be responsible for various tasks focused on community engagement and capacity building as an organizer. Candidates with experience building coalitions among diverse groups of people and holding volunteers accountable are preferred. The organizer reports directly to a Regional Organizing Director for the Virginia State Campaigns in Northern Virginia.

Tasks and Responsibilities include but not limited to:

  • Recruit, train and manage volunteers and expand the volunteer network
  • Plan, manage, and participate in phone banks and canvasses door to door
  • Amplify message and create online communities
  • Asian American outreach

Required Skills and Background

  • Exceptionally well organized with the ability to meet strict deadlines
  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills
  • Disciplined and solution-oriented approach to all tasks
  • Must have access to a vehicle and a cellphone
  • Previous campaign experience preferred
  • Candidates with proficiency in Korean, Vietnamese, or Mandarin are encouraged

Submit your resume and 3 references during Aug 1-8, 2017 to JoeMontanoFellows@gmail.com


Hirono Recovering After Second Planned Surgery

By Sophie Cocke

U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono’s surgery to remove part of her rib Tuesday was successful, and she is in recovery, according to staff from her office. The operation was the second of two surgeries planned since Hirono was diagnosed with stage 4 kidney cancer earlier this year.

Last month Hirono, 69, had one of her kidneys removed. The operations were expected to remove all traces of cancer.

It’s not clear when Hirono will be back at work, but she bounced back quickly from her first surgery, and during a speech on the Senate floor on Monday, she said that she looked forward to getting back to the fight against the Republican health care proposal.

“I’m going to be back as quickly as I can to keep up the fight against this mean, ugly bill,” she said. “The stakes are too high to stay silent.”

Hirono, who has held her Senate seat since 2012, has been firm about her plans to run for re-election next year, and her Hawaii colleagues in the House have made clear in recent days that she has their support. Both U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard and U.S. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa have issued early endorsements of Hirono’s re-election campaign.

Despite speculation in political circles in recent years that Gabbard might try to challenge Hirono for her Senate seat in a Democratic primary, Gabbard told the Honolulu Star-Advertiser earlier this month that she had promised Hirono both in 2013 and January of this year that she had no intention of doing so.

Last week, Gabbard endorsed Hirono, saying she was “encouraged by her fighting spirit.”

“I was happy to hear Mazie say that she is going to be running for re-election in 2018. It’s an honor to work with Sen. Hirono in Congress,” Gabbard wrote on her Facebook page. “As I’ve said before, Mazie is doing a great job in Washington and I fully endorse her re-election.

“I know she will keep working hard as a champion for women, education reform, affordable health care, immigration reform and so much more as she continues to represent Hawaii in the U.S. Senate.”

U.S. Rep. Colleen Hana­busa also endorsed Hirono yesterday morning, sending out an email to supporters asking them to support Hirono’s re-election through a $25 campaign contribution.

Hirono “never forgets where she comes from or who she’s fighting for,” Hanabusa wrote. “She’s spent her entire career fighting for the little guy and to make sure that Hawaii families have a fair shot at getting ahead. In Congress, we’ve teamed up to fight for legislation that will create opportunity for our keiki, keep our promises to our veterans and protect our aina. But battles don’t stay won and our work isn’t finished — not by a long shot. And we need Mazie with us.”

Hirono recovering after second planned surgery

Flippable Interviews Rep. Grace Meng

Rep. Grace Meng is our multi-time Endorsed Candidate and the recipient of our prior awards. The below is a repost of “From State Assembly to Congress: flippable interviews Representative Grace Meng

A few weeks ago, flippable co-founder Joseph and I sat down with Representative Grace Meng, a Congresswoman from New York’s 6th Congressional District. Representative Meng cut her teeth in New York’s State Assembly, where she represented the diverse community of Flushing, Queens.

Representative Meng had sought us out because she’s such an enthusiast of state politics. (“I know where I come from!” she exclaimed.) It was clear that her state-level work and her local constituents were never far from her mind. She lit up when recounting conversations with senior citizens and when describing how she’s tried to make their lives easier—for example, by stopping caller ID scams. And, true to her passion for the community, she wouldn’t let us leave without recommending some fantastic Chinese and Korean restaurants for us to try in the neighborhood.

Representative Grace Meng, New York's 6th Congressional District

Representative Grace Meng, New York’s 6th Congressional District

We were especially struck by Representative Meng’s humility and candor. When we asked her what achievement she was proudest of, she told us about authoring a bill to establish Lunar New Year as a school holiday. The bill, she admitted, had few co-sponsors and didn’t pass. But she was proud of having stood up to represent her community.

In light of this week’s disappointing vote on healthcare, Representative Meng’s attitude is one to emulate. Like her, we need to focus on the long game, with the knowledge that we’ll have many ups and downs along the way. We need to remain positive, pragmatic, and forward-thinking even as we encounter roadblocks. And we need to invest in serious, dedicated state-level leaders—so that, like Representative Meng, they can carry their knowledge of local communities’ needs to statewide and national office.  

Catherine Vaughan: Representative Meng, it’s a huge honor to be here with you. Thanks for taking time to speak with us and our community.

Grace Meng: Thank you!  I’m a big fan of your work on Twitter, and state legislative politics are near and dear to my heart because that’s where I got started.

CV: Let’s start from the beginning of your political career. What made you decide to run for State Assembly?

GM: After graduating from law school, I wanted to do something in public interest law. Throughout law school, I had interned in government agencies: the Department of Justice, the New York State Attorney General, Department of Education, and the IRS. It was exciting to be at the table, seeing decisions being made and how they impact our country.

After law school, I started by doing pro bono work, focusing on sanctuary for families and victims of domestic violence. Serving my community gave me the idea to run for state legislature, and it also gave me a leg up on my opponent. I spent two years holding office hours three of four times a week for senior citizens who didn’t speak English and needed translation services. It was basic stuff, but my opponent wasn’t doing this and didn’t have the same perspective.

CV: What were your biggest challenges in campaigning?

GM: I didn’t have political advisors like flippable or Emily’s List. I didn’t know where or who to turn to for advice; I didn’t know how to fundraise. I just knew how to provide community services for folks in the district, and tell my story about how I grew up and how I could help the community. I didn’t know any lobbyists or special interests. But since I grew up in the church, I did have a strong group of church and community leaders to go to.

“My experience running for New York State Assembly prepared me to run for Congress.”

CV: What was the most valuable thing you learned in the Assembly?

GM: I wasn’t the first, but I was the only Asian American in State Assembly. I learned how important it was to bring my Asian Americanness and female identity to work with me. In my first year, I had barely started my job when Lunar New Year conflicted with session. As the only Asian American assemblyperson, I felt I needed to take a stand—so I decided to stay home.

I was pregnant my first year for basically the entire session. Finding enough food to eat was a challenge! (I’m only half joking). When my second child was born, we learned that he had food allergies and needed special formula. That was when I learned that special formula was not covered by insurance companies (whereas Viagra was!). I pushed for a bill to get special formula covered. We weren’t able to pass it successfully, but it was important for me to try.

CV: What is the accomplishment you’re most proud of as a state legislator?

“Everything stems from local government.”
 

GM: When I started in 2009, one of first bills was to make Lunar New Year a school holiday. Most people laughed at me—I didn’t get a lot of co-sponsors, and neither the city nor state leadership was on board. Fast forward to 2014, and both the mayor and governor agreed it should be a school holiday. Just four years later, students have Lunar New Year off in New York City.

A lot of the time, we propose legislation not necessarily to get it passed that year, but to lay the groundwork. Politics is unpredictable, and you never know when something will catch fire.

CV: How did you make the decision to run for Congress?

GM: It’s not the typical story: I had 24 hours to decide. My predecessor announced Thursday night he wasn’t running again, and the deadline to collect petition signatures was Saturday morning. I had never felt so overwhelmed, but the experience also gave me clarity that this was the right next step for me.

More than anything else, my experience running for New York State Assembly prepared me to run for Congress. Because I didn’t have political experience going into state legislature a few years earlier, I had had to work harder than the average candidate to gain institutional knowledge and make friends outside of my district. Once elected to State Assembly, I had to prove myself in a short period of time to do well in re-election every two years. When the opportunity came to run for Congress, I had made friends and built bridges beyond the scope of my job, and proven myself as a legislator. The alliances and bridges I built made my jump into a Congressional race easier.

CV: It must have been quite the transition going from a Democratic New York State Assembly to a Republican-dominated Congress in the year of the government shutdown. What was it like to step into a much more hostile environment?

GM: Coming from a Democratic New York Assembly, I was used to thinking of ways to help more people and build a larger tent. The move to Congress was shocking, and the shutdown in particular made me feel trapped. I couldn’t understand why Republicans would be willing to shut down the government.

We met with Representative Meng in her campaign headquarters in Flushing, Queens

We met with Representative Meng in her campaign headquarters in Flushing, Queens

What’s different now is Republicans control everything. It’s incumbent upon all of us to let the public know that. Democrats are, for once, all on message. We need to keep drilling that in.

CV: A lot of our readers ask us what they can do if their representative is a Democrat. What would your advice be?

GM: Hearing from our constituents is incredibly important. I love getting a letter or postcard, or seeing social media posts in support of what we’re doing. This isn’t just for our ego; it truly makes us feel like the people have our back and we’re doing the right thing. It also gives us a stronger argument to show people who disagree with us. In my district, 2,000 constituents called asking Congress not to repeal Obamacare and only seven people called for repeal. This gave me even greater conviction in my vote against repeal.

CV: How has your experience in New York’s State Assembly informed your job in Congress?

“I learned how important it was to bring my Asian Americanness and female identity to work with me.”
 

GM: My experience as a state legislator has been tremendously important. I always tell people, “I know where I come from.” Everything stems from local government, and anyone who says otherwise is mistaken.

Knowing how laws and policies actually affect local constituents helps me reach across the aisle and push bipartisan legislation. If I hear that my constituents in Queens are suffering from caller ID scams, I can guess that the same type of situation is happening in GOP districts. I can find examples of how my Republican colleagues’ constituents are also getting hurt and help them see value in our legislation. The bill I’m referring to was federal, but it resonates more when we frame messages as local.

CV: How does messaging need to change in the Democratic party? What would you do differently?

GM: You know, I don’t agree completely that we need to change our message. We’re not going to go into brainstorming mode and come out with a message that surprises all of us. Democrats have a message; we know what we’re fighting for. Our job is to just make sure everyone has access. That’s our guiding principle every single day. The problem is, there are many corners of the country where people didn’t hear this message; they feel like they didn’t hear from us. Democrats spend a lot on television ads, but lots of people don’t watch TV. Our methods need to change. And we need to make sure we’re reaching people in all corners of the country. Where do we start?  Locally.

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